The Winter Antiques Show

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The Winter Antiques Show is on now through January 30th at the Park Avenue Armory at 67th and Park Avenue in NYC. One might think of antiques as old furniture or knick knacks, but this particular exhibition features a wide range of high-end material, from ancient Egyptian sculpture to paintings to Native American Indian masks and sculputres, as seen below. If you’re in the NYC area and want to learn more, visit www.winterantiquesshow.com.

Native American Indian art, sculpture and masks

The Master of the Blue Jeans

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When you think of the history of jeans, maybe you think of Levi’s, of cowboys riding their horses in the Wild West, or the 1950’s and James Dean, the Beatniks, with jeans and jean jackets being the style of the cool. But how about going way back … to the late 17th Century in Italy? A group of paintings, depicting poor people wearing various denim garments, have recently been attributed to one unknown painter, now referred to as “The Master of the Blue Jeans.” Another interesting footnote is that these paintings were made in Genoa, Italy, which was called “Genes” by the French, and later became “Geanes” in seventeenth-century English. Below are 2 paintings from this unknown painter.

The Master of the Blue Jeans

Art and Technology by Pehr Hovey of Syyn Labs

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Just heard about an art collective called Syyn Labs that takes art and technology and creates something new that combines the two. This video, titled “Contours,” records an interaction between the viewer and a mysterious black obelisk, which has been placed in a room (and which holds the technical components). This obelisk senses the movement of the viewer and renders an avatar on the wall with a brilliant green laser. Participants will begin to move in different directions in order to watch the laser impersonate their every move. This video captures one such interaction.

Contours from Pehr Hovey on Vimeo.

Famous Edgerton photograph inspires new product – a cereal bowl!

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The picture at left is by Dr. Harold Edgerton, who both invented the electronic flash and devoted his career to recording high-speed photography, which captured images that the human eye cannot see. This picture is titled Milk-Drop Coronet, and was taken in 1957, capturing the exact second where a milk drop makes contact with a hard surface and splashes up. So what comes next some 50 years later? How about a “milk splash” cereal bowl, pictured at right. You can bet the designers of this cereal bowl were very familiar with Dr. Edgerton’s famous photograph.

cereal bowl based on Edgerton's milk drop photograph